Su's Criminal Minds / MGG blog
Saturday, August 20, 2011
Reid shaking hands with people?

I’m trying to compile a list of all of the times Reid shook hands with people on the show.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

I know he shakes the hand of the female cop in LDSK.

He shakes the hand of Agent Amanda Gilroy (or something like that) in P911.

Someone told me he shook hands with the author of the book in Empty Planet.

Once the list is compiled I will try to get a screenshot of every one.

Can anyone else remember more?

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909 playsDownload

ROTFL. I adore Thomas Gibson even more now! He is so funny. I loved the phone conversation with Shemar. I wish we could have seen their faces during this.

Is there a video?

jeffreydahmer:

0laura0:

Thomas Gibson and Matthew Gray Gubler, hilarious press conference at the last  Monte Carlo TV Festival by Simona Siri.

Thomas: “Everyone wants to know, they ask me: is he as smart as he looks in tv? (about Matthew) NO WAY!”

You remember when in Monte Carlo the journalists asked if they received many letters, then Thomas phoned to Shemar … Well here the audio

french kissing each other onstage 

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Reid tells a joke: The Mathematician at the Indian Reservation

I found Reid’s existentialist joke to be funny and thought it would be amusing to see him tell more jokes. So I took these screencaps from Unfinished Business and staged them to have a visual effect of Reid telling a joke.

Hey guys! I’ve got a joke for you!

A Mathematician goes to an Indian Reservation to discuss how they calculate currency when dealing with traders. While there he spoke with three squaws, whom he identified by the hides on which they sat.

The squaw of the mountain lion hide told him, “My son is so fast, he can run to the mountains and back before the moon rises.”

The squaw of the buffalo hide told him, “My son is so strong, he can wrestle a buffalo to the ground.”

The squaw of the hippopotamus hide told him, “I have no sons, but I can run to the mountains and back before the moon rises and I can wrestle a buffalo to the ground.”

The Mathematician then realized that the squaw of the hippopotamus is equal to the sons of the squaws of the other two hides!

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Friday, August 19, 2011
Reid brushing up against Rossi as he moves to pass him in Memoriam.

Reid brushing up against Rossi as he moves to pass him in Memoriam.

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Article about Madison kidnappings. I can’t recall this case for some reason. Perhaps it was one we didn’t see. I find it interesting that Reid was the one on the phone with the police and he was the one who looked over the case file and was given most of the credit.
FBI ‘Crucial’ in Finding Madison Child Killer
By Stanley Hartdale
   Four children were dead. A fifth had gone missing. The small town of Madison locked all its doors, windows and even cancelled little league games.
   The Sheriff was exhausted. The Deputies were stressed and at a loss for things to say to members of the community who just wanted to know when they’re children would be safe again.
   ”I called in the FBI because I felt I had done everything within my own abilities to put an end to all this,” said Sheriff Donalds.
   ”When our help on the case was requested I was handed the file so that I could do a routine assessment of the case,” said Supervisory Special Agent Spencer Reid. “It became clear to me, about half way through the file: this was a serial and it wasn’t going to stop any time soon. So we came out to Madison and we were able to help.”
   Help indeed. Before they were even here, Agent Reid was on the phone with Sheriff Donalds warning him of another abduction. Sure enough, about an hour later he received a call that another child had gone missing. Normol protocol was thrown out the door.
   ”Normally we wait a few hours, but given the prior kidnappings and the advice from Agent Reid we were on teh case immediately. He gave us ideas of how to differentiate a missing child from one who had just wandered off for a few hours. By the time they got here, they were half way to solving the case.”
   The parents of the recovered child, who asked to remain anonymous, expressed their gratitude to Agent Reid and his team. “Without you we would be lost without our child.”
   Agent Reid dismissed their thanks amiably, adding, “It’s our job to help when we see fit. This was one of those times the threat was imminent and we acted. It’s a win for us.”

Article about Madison kidnappings. I can’t recall this case for some reason. Perhaps it was one we didn’t see. I find it interesting that Reid was the one on the phone with the police and he was the one who looked over the case file and was given most of the credit.

FBI ‘Crucial’ in Finding Madison Child Killer

By Stanley Hartdale

   Four children were dead. A fifth had gone missing. The small town of Madison locked all its doors, windows and even cancelled little league games.

   The Sheriff was exhausted. The Deputies were stressed and at a loss for things to say to members of the community who just wanted to know when they’re children would be safe again.

   ”I called in the FBI because I felt I had done everything within my own abilities to put an end to all this,” said Sheriff Donalds.

   ”When our help on the case was requested I was handed the file so that I could do a routine assessment of the case,” said Supervisory Special Agent Spencer Reid. “It became clear to me, about half way through the file: this was a serial and it wasn’t going to stop any time soon. So we came out to Madison and we were able to help.”

   Help indeed. Before they were even here, Agent Reid was on the phone with Sheriff Donalds warning him of another abduction. Sure enough, about an hour later he received a call that another child had gone missing. Normol protocol was thrown out the door.

   ”Normally we wait a few hours, but given the prior kidnappings and the advice from Agent Reid we were on teh case immediately. He gave us ideas of how to differentiate a missing child from one who had just wandered off for a few hours. By the time they got here, they were half way to solving the case.”

   The parents of the recovered child, who asked to remain anonymous, expressed their gratitude to Agent Reid and his team. “Without you we would be lost without our child.”

   Agent Reid dismissed their thanks amiably, adding, “It’s our job to help when we see fit. This was one of those times the threat was imminent and we acted. It’s a win for us.”

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Article from William Reid’s computer about the events in “Derailed”.
Fed Saves Railroad Passengers
By Rose Tamlyn
USNTNEWS.com
One Security Officer had already been shot and killed. The FBI Agent, who happened to be on the train, was handcuffed to her chair. The stand-off, which took place yesterday in a train car in Texas, could have ended far worse, authorities say.
"I only went in because I felt I had the best understanding of the suspect," said Special Supervisory Agent Spencer Reid, "In these situations, you have to first of all understand who it is you’re dealing with in order to save as many people as you can. Fortunately for us, we were able to save almost everyone."
When asked how he handled things once inside the train, Reid said simply, “Delicately.”
Doctor Ted Bryar, a physics professor in the midst of a psychological break, was put into custody after being rushed to the hospital, suffering a gunshot wound from another passenger. The passenger, whose name is being withheld by the FBI, had brought the gun on board, and waited for what he judged to be the opportune time to use the weapon.
"We do not condone the actions of the passenger who shot Doctor

The rest is cut off

Article from William Reid’s computer about the events in “Derailed”.

Fed Saves Railroad Passengers

By Rose Tamlyn

USNTNEWS.com

One Security Officer had already been shot and killed. The FBI Agent, who happened to be on the train, was handcuffed to her chair. The stand-off, which took place yesterday in a train car in Texas, could have ended far worse, authorities say.

"I only went in because I felt I had the best understanding of the suspect," said Special Supervisory Agent Spencer Reid, "In these situations, you have to first of all understand who it is you’re dealing with in order to save as many people as you can. Fortunately for us, we were able to save almost everyone."

When asked how he handled things once inside the train, Reid said simply, “Delicately.”

Doctor Ted Bryar, a physics professor in the midst of a psychological break, was put into custody after being rushed to the hospital, suffering a gunshot wound from another passenger. The passenger, whose name is being withheld by the FBI, had brought the gun on board, and waited for what he judged to be the opportune time to use the weapon.

"We do not condone the actions of the passenger who shot Doctor

The rest is cut off

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Article about Reid joining the BAU (from Memoriam)
BAU’s Newest Member
By Paul Milworth
   It’s not everyday the behavioral Analysis Unit of the FBI accepts a new member to their elite team. Even more rare is the addition of a 22 year-old to the team.
   ”Agent Spencer Reid has a gifted mind,” said team leader Special Supervisory Agent Jason Gideon, whose own resume dates back to the very beginning of the BAU. “He is young, and while he ahs never served in law enforcement, I see him as an integral part of the fugure of the BAU.”
   Others in the FBI community are surprised such a young man would be named to the FBI’s elite, but when asked, agent Reid had this to say, “My age is not the issue. Certainly, when dealing with an emotional situation it can be difficult to accept bad news. It’s one of the reasons logic needs to become a more prominent state of being. Logically speaking, I’m the most qualified for the job.”
   Indeed, with three doctorate degrees from Cal Tech already, and a staggering IQ of 187 (higher than Einstein’s, reportedly) as well as an eidetic memory, there is no psychological exam or test the FBI could put in front of him he could not ace inside of an hour.
   But what about the social aspect of the job? Knowing how to talk to victims’ families and dealing with local police are two facets law enforcement types will tell you are impossible to learn from a book. “It’s one of the reasons I have brought him aboard,” said Gideon. “With a little tutelage and some field experience there will be nothing Agent Reid will not be able to accomplish with this team.”

Article about Reid joining the BAU (from Memoriam)

BAU’s Newest Member

By Paul Milworth

   It’s not everyday the behavioral Analysis Unit of the FBI accepts a new member to their elite team. Even more rare is the addition of a 22 year-old to the team.

   ”Agent Spencer Reid has a gifted mind,” said team leader Special Supervisory Agent Jason Gideon, whose own resume dates back to the very beginning of the BAU. “He is young, and while he ahs never served in law enforcement, I see him as an integral part of the fugure of the BAU.”

   Others in the FBI community are surprised such a young man would be named to the FBI’s elite, but when asked, agent Reid had this to say, “My age is not the issue. Certainly, when dealing with an emotional situation it can be difficult to accept bad news. It’s one of the reasons logic needs to become a more prominent state of being. Logically speaking, I’m the most qualified for the job.”

   Indeed, with three doctorate degrees from Cal Tech already, and a staggering IQ of 187 (higher than Einstein’s, reportedly) as well as an eidetic memory, there is no psychological exam or test the FBI could put in front of him he could not ace inside of an hour.

   But what about the social aspect of the job? Knowing how to talk to victims’ families and dealing with local police are two facets law enforcement types will tell you are impossible to learn from a book. “It’s one of the reasons I have brought him aboard,” said Gideon. “With a little tutelage and some field experience there will be nothing Agent Reid will not be able to accomplish with this team.”

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The article on William Reid’s computer that talked about Spencer’s PhDs.
A transcription of the text:
One Down, Two to Go
   A year ago I wrote a story on young Spencer Reid who had just graduated college… at the age of sixteen! It is rare for such a young student to fulfill their undergraduate but to go on the following year and achieve his doctorate degree in Mathematics the next is a bit unheard of.
   ”I’m thinking this next year I’ll go for either Chemistry or Engineering. I haven’t deciced where I want to focus my energy just yet,” says the young super-genius. When I ask why he chose Cal Tech over MIT and Standford, he quickly runs down a list of Professors he had a desire to study with. He makes no mention of the weather or girls.
   ”There was a week or two where I thought I might go to Yale to study the Classics,” he says, “But then I realized I’ve already read everything they teach in the curriculum.” Sound absurd? It is, until you remember he can read 20,000 words per minute. How does that skill translate to math equations, I ask. “Surprisingly well,” he says, “Once you’ve taught one part of your brain to concentrate to focus, it frees up energy in another part of your brain which can give you a certain lucidity, Time

And then the article cuts off. :-(

The article on William Reid’s computer that talked about Spencer’s PhDs.

A transcription of the text:

One Down, Two to Go

   A year ago I wrote a story on young Spencer Reid who had just graduated college… at the age of sixteen! It is rare for such a young student to fulfill their undergraduate but to go on the following year and achieve his doctorate degree in Mathematics the next is a bit unheard of.

   ”I’m thinking this next year I’ll go for either Chemistry or Engineering. I haven’t deciced where I want to focus my energy just yet,” says the young super-genius. When I ask why he chose Cal Tech over MIT and Standford, he quickly runs down a list of Professors he had a desire to study with. He makes no mention of the weather or girls.

   ”There was a week or two where I thought I might go to Yale to study the Classics,” he says, “But then I realized I’ve already read everything they teach in the curriculum.” Sound absurd? It is, until you remember he can read 20,000 words per minute. How does that skill translate to math equations, I ask. “Surprisingly well,” he says, “Once you’ve taught one part of your brain to concentrate to focus, it frees up energy in another part of your brain which can give you a certain lucidity, Time

And then the article cuts off. :-(

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Morgan and Rossi speaking with William Reid (Spencer Reid’s father) at work. For the record, William works for Wieder Kirschenbaum & Moore Attorneys at Law in Summerlin (I think that is a city? Or is it a subdivision of LV?).

Morgan and Rossi speaking with William Reid (Spencer Reid’s father) at work. For the record, William works for Wieder Kirschenbaum & Moore Attorneys at Law in Summerlin (I think that is a city? Or is it a subdivision of LV?).

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The car loan statement for Reid’s father on Garcia’s computer.
Note that it says the statement date is July 16, 1999 and that the next payment is due 08/01/99.
The father owns a 2005 Toyota Prius and his address is:
William Reid
3110 Knoll Ave
Las Vegas, NV 89167

The car loan statement for Reid’s father on Garcia’s computer.

Note that it says the statement date is July 16, 1999 and that the next payment is due 08/01/99.

The father owns a 2005 Toyota Prius and his address is:

William Reid

3110 Knoll Ave

Las Vegas, NV 89167

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Paget Brewster on the Conan O’Brien show in 2009. She’s hilarious. I adore Paget so much.

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And, the last one from this episode for awhile.
Elle talking to Hotch on the BAU jet at the end of Unfinished Business.

And, the last one from this episode for awhile.

Elle talking to Hotch on the BAU jet at the end of Unfinished Business.

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Hotch looking at Elle (who is off screen)
From Unfinished Business.

Hotch looking at Elle (who is off screen)

From Unfinished Business.

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Morgan looking both amused and mildly surprised about Gideon’s past actions.
From Unfinished Business.

Morgan looking both amused and mildly surprised about Gideon’s past actions.

From Unfinished Business.

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Morgan chewing on a toothpick while laughing at Max Ryan’s story.
From Unfinished Business.

Morgan chewing on a toothpick while laughing at Max Ryan’s story.

From Unfinished Business.

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